Latest Parliamentary Replies As Burmese Military Extends Its Attacks In Kachin and Shan States – Calls in Parliament for Generals to be referred to the International Criminal Court and for An Independent Assessment of Whether Genocide Has Occurred against Rohingyas and Kachin


See…First they came for the Rohingya Muslims https://www.forbes.com/sites/ewelinaochab/2018/06/11/first-they-came-for-the-rohingya-muslims/#661249ff2cde   by Ewelina Ochab

Questions in Parliament….

Burma

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:30:03 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8755 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8755):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what consideration they have given to evidence suggesting genocidal techniques being used by the government of Burma against Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine, Christian minorities in Kachin, and other protected groups, including (1) killing members of those groups, (2) causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of those groups, and (3) deliberately inflicting on those groups conditions of life calculated to bring about their physical destruction in whole or in part. (HL8755)

Tabled on: 19 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The Foreign Secretary has been clear that ethnic cleansing has taken place in Rakhine, and that the violence of August and September 2017 may even constitute genocide, though that would be a determination for an international court to make. We are supporting the UN Fact Finding Mission into human rights violations and abuses in Burma, in particular Rakhine; we await its final report in September 2018. On 31 May, the Burmese Government announced a Commission of Inquiry. We have made clear that there must be a credible, transparent and impartial investigation, which holds to account the perpetrators of atrocities in Rakhine State.

As I told the House of Lords on 12 June, the Government is currently unable to make a full assessment of the situation in Kachin State due to access restrictions.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:29.

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:31:01 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8678 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8678):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what actions they have taken following reports that crimes against humanity are being committed against religious or ethno-religious minorities in Burma. (HL8678)

Tabled on: 18 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The Foreign Secretary expressed his deep concern about fighting in Kachin on 5 June, and the Minister for Asia and the Pacific called on 11 May for Burma’s military to respect International Humanitarian Law, show restraint and protect civilians in Kachin. In their meeting on 3 May the British Ambassador called on Burma’s Commander in Chief to ensure Burma’s military protected civilians during operations in Kachin.

The UK has ensured the UN Security Council has called for accountability for human rights violations in Rakhine including through its 31 May letter to Burma calling on it to establish an independent and transparent investigation with international involvement. The UK also continues to support the UN Fact Finding Mission into human rights violations and abuses in Burma; we await its final report in September 2018.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:30.

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:31:01 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8680 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8680):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of reports that the violence perpetrated by the government of Burma against the Rohingya Muslims, Christian minorities and others may constitute genocide. (HL8680)

Tabled on: 18 June 2018

This question was grouped with the following question(s) for answer:

  1. To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the nature of the violence perpetrated by the government of Burma against the Rohingya Muslims, Christian minorities and other minority groups. (HL8679)
    Tabled on: 18 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The Foreign Secretary has made clear that the military operations conducted in Rakhine in August and September 2017 constitute ethnic cleansing, and may even be genocide, though that should be a determination for an international court to make.

The Foreign Secretary expressed his deep concern about the intensifying conflict in Kachin on 5 June, and called for Burma’s military to exercise restraint and allow humanitarian access when he spoke to Burma’s State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi on 11 June. Officials from the British Embassy have visited Kachin in May and in June, but as I told the House of Lords on 12 June, the Government is unable to make a full assessment of the situation in Kachin State due to access restrictions.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:30.

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:31:01 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8679 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8679):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the nature of the violence perpetrated by the government of Burma against the Rohingya Muslims, Christian minorities and other minority groups. (HL8679)

Tabled on: 18 June 2018

This question was grouped with the following question(s) for answer:

  1. To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of reports that the violence perpetrated by the government of Burma against the Rohingya Muslims, Christian minorities and others may constitute genocide. (HL8680)
    Tabled on: 18 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The Foreign Secretary has made clear that the military operations conducted in Rakhine in August and September 2017 constitute ethnic cleansing, and may even be genocide, though that should be a determination for an international court to make.

The Foreign Secretary expressed his deep concern about the intensifying conflict in Kachin on 5 June, and called for Burma’s military to exercise restraint and allow humanitarian access when he spoke to Burma’s State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi on 11 June. Officials from the British Embassy have visited Kachin in May and in June, but as I told the House of Lords on 12 June, the Government is unable to make a full assessment of the situation in Kachin State due to access restrictions.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:30.

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:32:01 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8681 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8681):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the International Criminal Court consideration of its jurisdiction over the displacement of the Rohingya Muslims, what consideration they have given to tabling a resolution at the UN Security Council to establish an investigative team to collect and preserve the evidence for possible prosecutions. (HL8681)

Tabled on: 18 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

If the Court were to consider that it has jurisdiction over the crime of deportation in the context of the situation in Bangladesh, it would be for the appropriate organs of the Court to consider how to progress any investigation in line with the provisions of the Rome Statute.

The UK co-sponsored the UN Human Rights Council resolution which set up a UN Fact Finding Mission (FFM) on human rights abuses in Burma, and subsequent resolutions that gave it the mandate and resources to collect, preserve and share evidence. Following the Special Rapporteur’s recommendations, the Government is discussing with international partners how to support evidence-collecting efforts, especially in relation to sexual violence

Pressure from the UN Security Council on accountability helped persuade Burma to announce plans for a Commission of Inquiry into violence in Rakhine State. We continue to emphasise that we need an accountability mechanism which is credible, transparent and impartial, and which can hold to account the perpetrators of atrocities.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:31.

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:33:01 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8682 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8682):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what options they have considered to ensure that the violence perpetrated in Burma is adequately assessed and those responsible brought to justice. (HL8682)

Tabled on: 18 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The UK co-sponsored the UN Human Rights Council Resolution in March 2017 that commissioned the Fact Finding Mission into human rights violations by military and security forces, and abuses, in Burma, in particular in Rakhine State; we await its final report in September 2018.

Burma announced on 31 May that it plans to establish a Commission of Inquiry into human rights abuses in Rakhine. We have made clear that there must be a credible, transparent and impartial investigation, which holds to account the perpetrators of atrocities in Rakhine State. We will continue to work with our international partners to support those building evidence and testimony for the victims of the violence in Rakhine.

The Minister for Asia and the Pacific called on 11 May for Burma’s military to respect International Humanitarian Law, show restraint and protect civilians in Kachin.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:32.

From: Written Parliamentary Questions and Answers
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:33:02 PM
To: ALTON OF LIVERPOOL, Lord
Subject: Written answer to your QWA HL8757 received from Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8757):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they have taken in international fora or bilaterally to address the situation of religious and ethno-religious groups in Burma. (HL8757)

Tabled on: 19 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

I raised the UK’s concerns about the persecution faced by Rohingya Muslims, Christians and other minorities in Burma in my speech to the Human Rights Council of 27 February 2018.

Our Embassy in Burma has been supporting local projects addressing the drivers of prejudice and inter-communal violence. In 2017 it delivered a two-day inter-faith dialogue in partnership with the Myanmar Institute of Theology; and a workshop for civil servants, parliamentarians and non-governmental organisations.

We ensured that the UN Security Council letter of 31 May to Burma called for an independent and transparent domestic investigation with international involvement.

Date and time of answer: 27 Jun 2018 at 13:32.

 

Baroness Fairhead, Department for International Trade, provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8544):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 12 June, whether they plan to issue official guidance to British companies not to engage in any form of business with companies owned by the Burmese military. (HL8544)

Tabled on: 12 June 2018

Answer:
Baroness Fairhead:

DIT continues to support trade with Burma as an important part of driving mutual prosperity. We believe responsible trade and investment has a role to play in Burma’s long-term transition from a military dictatorship with a closed economy to a democracy with an open economy.

UK businesses have their own internal processes for determining their investment and trading partners. DIT offers advice and support on working with local partners and encourages all British companies to undertake appropriate due diligence on any investment projects. DIT also ensures companies are aware of UK legislation including the UK Bribery Act (2010) and any relevant sanctions.

Date and time of answer: 26 Jun 2018 at 18:02.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8543):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 12 June, what assessment they have made of claims that the lack of international action taken against Burmese military leaders in response to the Rohingya crisis has emboldened them to escalate violence against Christians and other religious minority groups in Myanmar; whether they plan to make a public statement of support for a UN mandated global arms embargo against Myanmar; and whether they plan to support any targeted financial sanctions and travel restrictions against members of the Burmese military. (HL8543)

Tabled on: 12 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

Since the Burmese military’s operations in Rakhine in August and September 2017, the UK has secured: EU agreement to introduce new sanctions targeting individual Burmese military commanders responsible for clearance operations in Rakhine; a strengthened EU Arms Embargo; and a UN Security Council Presidential Statement calling for Burma to hold to account those responsible for human rights violations in Rakhine State. The Government continues to assess that there is insufficient support at present for a UN Security Council Resolution instituting a global arms embargo for Burma.

The UK has made clear its deep concern about the resumption of hostilities in Kachin, Shan and Karen States in recent months and called for Burma’s military to exercise restraint, including in the Foreign Secretary’s call with State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi on 11 June and the British Ambassador’s meeting with Burma’s Commander in Chief Min Aung Hlaing on 3 May.

 

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8545):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 12 June, what practical steps they are taking to facilitate the referral of members of the Burmese military to the International Criminal Court. (HL8545)

Tabled on: 12 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The International Criminal Court (ICC) takes up cases when national authorities are unable or unwilling to prosecute. On 31 May, the Burmese Government announced a Commission of Inquiry to investigate human rights violations in Rakhine. The UK has welcomed the Commission while making clear that it needs to be credible, transparent and impartial. If adequate, a Burmese-led process offers the best chance of convictions which are accepted by the population.

Following the UN Security Council’s visit to Burma the UK discussed accountability options with Council members. There remains insufficient support in the Council for an ICC referral at this time, but this may change should we judge the Burmese Commission of Inquiry prove to be not credible.

Date and time of answer: 26 Jun 2018 at 17:32.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, has provided the following answer to your written parliamentary question (HL8546):

Question:
To ask Her Majesty’s Government (1) what practical steps they are taking, and (2) what resources they are making available, to give effect to the UN doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect in response to reports of identity-based violence in Kachin; and how they are addressing any gaps in their approaches to predicting, preventing and responding to mass atrocities; to developing a cross-departmental strategy on atrocity prevention; and the integration of mass atrocity prevention into existing policy commitments and decision-making processes. (HL8546)

Tabled on: 12 June 2018

Answer:
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon:

The Foreign Secretary spoke to Burma’s State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi on 11 June and called for the Burmese military to exercise restraint and allow humanitarian access to those affected by recent fighting in Kachin. The UK’s cross-Government approach to atrocity prevention includes the prediction and prevention of identity-based mass violence, alongside other forms of violence and instability, and is set within the Government’s wider work on conflict prevention. Our early warning systems, such as our annual internal report on Countries at Risk of Instability, are complemented by shorter-term horizon-scanning tools, which assist policymakers in prioritising and directing Government engagement and activity on atrocity prevention and the Responsibility to Protect.

Date and time of answer: 26 Jun 2018 at 17:33.

=====================

12 June 2018

Question

2.59 pm

Asked by

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of recent reports of the Burmese military attacking Christians in Kachin, and other ethnic minorities in Burma; what representations they have made to the government of Burma about these reports; and what consideration they have given to the case for referring the government of Burma to the International Criminal Court.

My Lords, the Government have expressed their deep concern at the surge of fighting in Kachin since April. We have called upon the Burmese military and all parties to cease hostilities and allow the humanitarian access that is required to be provided to displaced people. Turning to Rakhine, the Burmese authorities must show that the commission of inquiry can deliver accountability for the perpetrators of atrocities. If not, the Government will consider supporting international routes to justice.

I am grateful to the Minister for that reply. Those responsible have been emboldened by the ethnic cleansing of 750,000 Rohingya Muslims, the destruction of villages and killings, torture and rape. What practical things do we intend to do in response to the United Nations estimate that fighting in Kachin and Shan states has now driven a further 120,000 people into 167 inaccessible displacement camps? How are we responding to the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court’s request that these unconscionable war crimes and crimes against humanity be referred to her court? Is not it high time that senior members of the Burmese military such as General Min Aung Hlaing are targeted with sanctions and brought to justice?

On the noble Lord’s final point, of course we have exercised the tool of sanctions against several members of the military, and continue to use that tool. On his more specific point on the displacement of people in Kachin, there has been an emboldening. Not only has the Rohingya community suffered immensely following its displacement—with almost 1 million in Bangladesh, if you take it over a longer period—but so too have specific communities in Kachin, predominantly Christian minority communities. There has been internal displacement, and quite often the full extent of that displacement has not been revealed because of lack of access. There is a glimmer of hope from the civilian Administration in that, for the first time, we have seen Burma sign an MoU with the UN agencies concerned—the UNHCR and the UNDP—which took place on 7 June. In a recent conversation with the civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, my right honourable friend the Foreign Secretary reiterated the importance of ensuring the full return of all refugees, be they from Rakhine or from Kachin.

My Lords, remembering the role that the late Robin Cook played as Labour Foreign Secretary in his advocacy of the International Criminal Court, have the Government ever referred anyone to that court?

In terms of how many times there have been actual referrals, I will have to write to the noble and learned Lord. I assure him that the Government are fully supportive of the ICC and its efforts in this regard. We support all mechanisms in bringing the perpetrators of crime to justice.

My Lords, is the Minister aware that the last time I was in Kachin state I visited a village where I was told of how a local woman was abducted by the Burmese army, tied to a post in the army camp in full view of her family, repeatedly dragged away presumably for rape or other maltreatment, and eventually disappeared? A recent statement from the Kachin global network claims that:

“There have also been ongoing abductions, deaths, and injuries by landmine explosion, torture and subsequent health problems, and mortar shells exploding on civilians’ houses”.

Will Her Majesty’s Government raise as a priority with the Burmese Government the issue of the atrocities and violations of human rights perpetrated with impunity by the Burmese army?

Let me assure the noble Baroness that we are doing just that. We have all been horrified, first by what we saw in the Rohingya crisis, and now by the situation we see unravelling in Kachin. I assure her and all noble Lords that we will continue to implore the Burmese authorities, and that includes bilateral visits such as those made by my right honourable friends the Foreign Secretary and the Minister of State for Asia, Mark Field. We will continue to raise this through international fora, both at the UN and at the Human Rights Council.

My Lords, the reported atrocities against the Rohingya have been described as crimes against humanity, ethnic cleansing and genocide. What assessment have Her Majesty’s Government made as to whether the human rights violations in Kachin and Shan states meet the criteria of at least crimes against humanity and war crimes?

The right reverend Prelate is correct on the issue of the Rohingya, and as a Government we think that ethnic cleansing has taken place. Indeed, that is self-evident because of the number of refugees we have seen pour into Bangladesh. As I said in response to an earlier question, the situation in Kachin is of deep concern, but because of the lack of access for international agencies it is difficult to determine the issue of genocide more specifically. As regards judicial opinion, we will be guided appropriately, but we have certainly seen ethnic cleansing take place in Rakhine state—there is no better term for it—as well as in Kachin. What we are seeing is very troubling, but a full assessment cannot be made because of the lack of access.

My Lords, 32% of Burma’s population are from ethnic minorities, so we are seeing the systematic persecution of people spread from one group like the Rohingya to another like those in Rakhine state. Can my noble friend the Minister please outline whether this systematic persecution has had any impact on the ability of the UK Government to employ people from the Burmese ethnic-minority population in our embassy in Rangoon? I understand that around 70% of the embassy’s staff are normally recruited locally. Can he confirm that we are not restricted in who we can recruit by virtue of this persecution?

Our recruitment policy reflects the impartiality we would employ in any circumstances. It would be beneficial for all noble Lords to know the exact numbers and I will look into that. My noble friend, who speaks from great experience, makes an important point; namely, that we need to ensure that we demonstrate the inclusive nature of our operations in all our actions, including the efforts we are making on the ground in Rangoon. As I have said, there is a degree of hope, in that for the first time the United Nations is now gaining access to parts of Burma. We will continue to impress on both the civilian and military authorities for that access to be applicable universally across the country.

 Questions raised in Parliament.

Q

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Asked on: 11 June 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

HL8476

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their response to the report by the Karen Peace Network The Nightmare Returns: Karen hopes for peace and stability dashed by Burma Army’s actions, published in April, and to reports of the displacement of civilians following fighting between the Burma Army and the Karen National Liberation Army.

 

Q

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Asked on: 11 June 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

HL8477

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of whether UN documentation of attacks on ethnic groups in Burma provides evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

 

Q

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Asked on: 11 June 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

HL8478

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with (1) the government of Burma about the culture of impunity which has enabled the Burmese military potentially to carry out crimes against humanity, and (2) international partners about holding perpetrators to account through international judicial mechanisms.

 

Q

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Asked on: 11 June 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

HL8479

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with international partners about the reintroduction of targeted sanctions directed at members of the Burmese military who have been involved in ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity.

 

Q

Asked by Lord Alton of Liverpool

Asked on: 11 June 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

HL8480

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the implications for human rights of the breaking of the 2012 ceasefire in Burma’s Karen State.

Also see these Questions tabled on June 13th 2018:

Burma WPQs

===================================================================

For Immediate Release from CSW

13 June 2018

 

BURMA: LORDS QUESTION GOVERNMENT ON BURMA ARMY ATTACKS ON CHRISTIANS IN KACHIN STATE

 

Lord Alton of Liverpool tabled a debate in the House of Lords on 12 June, drawing attention to reports of the Burma Army attacking Christians in Burma’s Kachin State and asking about the UK government’s response, including “what consideration they have given to the case for referring the government of Burma to the International Criminal Court?”

According to the United Nations (UN), renewed fighting between the Burma Army and Kachin Independence Army has led to the displacement of at least 4,000 civilians since early April. In a statement on 9 June, to mark the seventh anniversary of the resumption of conflict in Kachin State, Global Kachin Communities claimed as many as 7,000 have been displaced in the past two months.

In his response, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), expressed the government’s “deep concern” at the situation in Kachin State since April:

“We have called upon the Burmese military and all parties to cease hostilities and allow the humanitarian access that is required to be provided to displaced people. Turning to Rakhine, the Burmese authorities must show that the commission of inquiry can deliver accountability for the perpetrators of atrocities. If not, the Government will consider supporting international routes to justice.”

The Lord Bishop of St Albans noted that “the reported atrocities against the Rohingya have been described as crimes against humanity, ethnic cleansing and genocide”, and asked “whether the human rights violations in Kachin and Shan states meet the criteria of at least crimes against humanity and war crimes?”

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon agreed that ethnic cleansing has taken place against the Rohingya, adding that “the situation in Kachin is of deep concern, but because of the lack of access for international agencies it is difficult to determine the issue of genocide more specifically. As regards judicial opinion, we will be guided appropriately, but we have certainly seen ethnic cleansing take place in Rakhine state—there is no better term for it—as well as in Kachin. What we are seeing is very troubling, but a full assessment cannot be made because of the lack of access.”

He later said that “there is a degree of hope, in that for the first time the United Nations is now gaining access to parts of Burma. We will continue to impress on both the civilian and military authorities for that access to be applicable universally across the country.”

On 26 April, the UN Secretary-General António Guterres announced the appointment of Christine Schraner Burgener of Switzerland, an experienced diplomat, as his new Special Envoy on Myanmar.

Benedict Rogers, CSW’s East Asia Team Leader, said: “We welcome this short debate in the House of Lords to highlight the appalling plight of the Kachin people. Seven years after the Burma Army broke a ceasefire with the Kachin Independence Army (KIA), the humanitarian consequences of this conflict are very grave and the human rights violations continue to be perpetrated with impunity. The world has, understandably, focused on the terrible suffering of the Rohingyas, but it is essential that the Kachin and others in northern Burma are not forgotten, and that urgent steps are taken to end this conflict, bring about a genuine, meaningful and inclusive peace process through political dialogue, ensure unrestricted access for humanitarian aid to reach those displaced by war, and address impunity.”


For further information or to arrange interviews please contact Kiri Kankhwende, Press and Public Affairs Team Leader at CSW on +44 (0) 208 329 0045, +44 (0) 782 332 9663 or email kiri@csw.org.uk.

 CSW – Burma Briefing Kachin

CSW is an advocacy organisation defending and promoting the right to freedom of religion or belief in over 20 countries across Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. As Christians, we stand with everyone facing injustice because of their religion or belief. www.csw.org.uk